Luciano Fabro (1936)

In a network of steel wire hangs a large, oval-shaped wonderfully coloured azure-blue piece of marble. The heavily veined stone is polished on one side and left rough on the other. ‘The double face of the sky’ refers simultaneously to the Italian sky (the polished part) and the cloudy Dutch sky (the rougher side of the stone). Fabro became famous as an arte-povera artist, working with natural and vulnerable materials. In his work, nature is an important source of inspiration and he tackles big themes from art and culture in the wider sense, both from the past and the present.

The work is attached to two Douglas pines. It is surrounded by blueberries and an upsurge of summer oak. The shrill cries of the tree creeper, which climbs from bottom to top searching for insects in the tree bark, are often heard. At the beginning of the path leading to the work there is a beautiful flower meadow. In ‘Italian’ weather, many butterflies including tiny coppers, red admirals and graylings can be seen fluttering around here.

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Luciano Fabro (1936)